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How to : Fix duplicate pinned taskbar icons in Windows 7

A common and annoying problem with Windows 7’s “Pin to Taskbar” feature, is when an application accidentally gets pinned multiple times. You might have run into this issue, resulting in a taskbar that looks something like this :

duplicate taskbar icons

In this screenshot, there are two yellow VMWare icons. The program was launched using the icon on the left, but when it opens, it creates a second duplicate icon on the taskbar. Annoying!

How to remove duplicated pinned taskbar icons :

Taskbar icons get duplicated when a shortcut is pinned to the taskbar, rather than the program itself. The solution is to find and remove the extra shortcut. The most straightforward way to do this is simply to right click and “Unpin” all the icons for the program in question, launch the program via the Start Menu, and then right click the running program on the taskbar to re-pin it.

Sometimes we’ve run into situations where this doesn’t resolve the problem. There’s usually a hidden shortcut that is being referenced by the running program. In this case, the solution is to “Show Hidden Files” in Windows Explorer, and navigate to the system path for taskbar shortcuts. This path is : C:\Users\%username%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned\TaskBar – there you can attempt deleting the shortcut manually, and re-adding it once again.

Helped you out? Have questions? Let us know in the comments below!


Advisory : Microsoft ending support for XP computers and Office 2003 on April 8th, 2014

If you haven’t yet heard, Microsoft is formally ending support for computers running Windows XP, and Office 2003  on April 8th, 2014. Although this date has been announced for some time, we know a considerable number of people who still rely on systems using XP. Read more to find out about what this means to your organization.

2014-01-21 16_51_45-Support ends in 2014 for Windows XP and Office 2003!

Windows XP End-of-Life : What changes?

Although formal support will end for XP and Office 2003, systems will continue running indefinitely. The main changes to expect with XP’s end-of-life event are :

  1. No further operating system patches – Patches keep Windows up to date and at least reasonably protected from malicious attacks. With no further updates being released by Microsoft, XP and Office will become increasingly insecure and vulnerable to 3rd party malware and viruses.
  2. Microsoft Security Essentials will be discontinued for XP – Microsoft’s widely used anti-virus program, and its underlying “Windows Defender” software will no longer be updated. Paired with a lack of new operating system patches, this will only make XP even less attractive to the businesses which rely on it. Luckly (and somewhat bewilderingly), Microsoft just announced (Jan 15, 2014) they would continue releasing updates for MSE until July 14th, 2015.

Analysis and Next Steps

So, what is a responsible business owner to do? The answer, we think, is not simple. A great number of the world’s computers (an estimated 28%) still rely on XP. Integrated systems also tend to rely on XP, as it is a proven and stable development platform. Practically all U.S. ATMs, for instance, are reported to use the operating system. So, the chance Microsoft will extend support for XP is likely – a notion their Jan 15th announcement supports. And others in the community have expressed their disbelief about the true impact of XP’s ‘death’ as well.

But, all the same – while we won’t preach doom and gloom – it does make sense to begin migrating critical business systems from XP to a newer operating system – and of course, we’re here to help.


How To : Remove passwords / editing restrictions on MS Word and Excel Files

Have you ever come across a word or excel document that was ‘password protected’ – where certain parts of the document you were unable to edit?

Frequently these are used in business settings, and with good reason – to protect formulas, proprietary information, sections of contracts, et cetera.

But, sometimes you need to edit a restricted document, and your colleague is not at their computer or out to lunch, on vacation, or otherwise missing in action. Not to worry, we’ll show you how to remove the password from a restricted Word or Excel document. All you’ll need is MS Office 2007/2010/2013, the free software 7-Zip (which we recommend everyone use for archive management!), and a bit of technical support know-how from your local IT pro.

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1. Ensure your file is in the latest .docX or .xlsX format. If your file is in an earlier office format, do a ‘Save As’, select ‘docx’ as the format type, and make sure you leave the ‘maintain compatibilty’ box empty. We want the latest file format.

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2. Open windows explorer and find your file. Make a copy of the file, and change the file extension from .docx to .zip.

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3. Right click the .zip file, and using the 7zip context menu, ‘Open Archive’ using the 7zip archive manager. This will allow you to edit the .docx archive without extracting the XML files inside.

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4. Navigate to /word, and find the settings.xml file. Right click the file, and select ‘edit’. – This is important, do not choose ‘open’ or any other option – only ‘edit’ will work.

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5. Find the XML element beginning with w:documentprotection, highlighted in the screenshot above. Remove the entire element, including < and > brackets.

6. Save, close, and update the archive when prompted.

7. Rename your file, changing the .zip extension back to .docx

8. Enjoy!

Hopefully this has assisted someone out there in Atlanta, and let us know if this solved your IT support needs in the comments!

Thanks to this post on Spiceworks, and this helpful blog : http://itintheory.blogspot.com/2012/06/remove-editing-restrictions-in-word.html for the inspiration.

 


Using Euclid Network’s Logmein PRO Remote Access Portal

For current partners on IT support plans, we offer a complimentary remote access portal, utilizing a full featured license to LogMeIn PRO. This license is valid for all the machines you currently have on a plan with us, and the remote access portable is configurable in a variety of ways.

VIDEO INSTRUCTIONS HERE : http://youtu.be/XYgXLRi5Ts8

To gain access to your personalized portal, please contact us directly. Once you have received your credentials, please log in and use the portal using the following procedure :

1. Visit the portal at https://user.itsupport247.net/

Euclid-IT-Support-Logmein-Remote-Access-Atlanta-1

2. Enter your portal username and password, as provided by our staff. Select the check box ‘Remote in to Favorite Desktop’ for faster access in the future. You will then be prompted to set up Two-Factor Authentication for your account, along with link and guidelines on doing this using a Google, Microsoft, or Authy smartphone app. If you are in a hurry, you currently may select ‘skip’ to bypass this step temporarily.

3. Once 2FA is set up, on the portal homescreen, you will see a list of computers you have access to. To the left of the computer name, there are three icons highlighted in the screenshot below. In order, they are : “Remote Control”, “System Info”, and “Favorite”

4. Click the star to favorite your most used computer. Then, click the left icon to establish a Remote Control session. The next screen should appear, asking you to install the remote access software. This is a one-time installation, and will not need to be done every time you connect.

Euclid IT Support Logmein Remote Access Atlanta 3

5. This screen may appear differently depending on which web browser you use. Follow the prompts to install the LogMeIn plugin. Once installed, you should connect to the computer.

6. Once connected, you will be prompted to enter the login information for your computer. This is the username and password you normally use while physically at the computer, not the remote access website password you entered earlier.

7. Success! You are now connected to your system. Select ‘Remote Access’ from the menu.

8. You may be prompted to update your windows firewall settings the first time you connect. This is a one time adjustment. Select all the checkboxes highlighted above, and “Allow Access”

9. You can now control your system remotely as if you were sitting in front of it. There are a few notable icons on the top bar, as highlighted in the screenshot above:

  • On the left side, the icon with two overlapping rectangles lets you switch screens on your remote computer, if your office computer has a multi-monitor setup.
  • The middle icon we’ve highlighted looks like a pyramid. This button will send CTL-ALT-DEL to the remote computer.
  • On the right, we’ve highlighted the ‘fullscreen’ and ‘x’ buttons. This will make the remote control session go fullscreen, allowing you to be more productive.

That’s it! If you have questions or need IT assistance with your computer’s remote access software in Atlanta, please contact us directly at 404-593-0083404-593-0083+14045930083+14045930083” data-isfreecall=”false” data-isrtl=”false” data-ismobile=”false”>404-593-0083404-593-0083, or by e-mail at info@euclidnet.com.


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